Public sector thought leadership

The following articles were written by Strategy& partners and other senior professionals on key topics in the public sector.

Reconsidering military ICT security
GCC militaries must reconsider how they manage information. They should accept that sharing information comes with risk that they can actively manage. GCC militaries can thereby share and safeguard information at the same time, while handling information based on how likely it is to be lost and the effect of its loss.
Putting outcomes first
Middle East governments need a way to keep track of their performance as they begin work on large-scale economic and national development plans. They should adopt outcome-based performance management, whose key aspects include the role and structure of a central performance management entity, key enablers in the areas of human capital, culture change, technology, and measurement; and flexibility in altering the approach as circumstances warrant.
The emerging GCC defence market
GCC governments must spend more thoughtfully on defence to develop a more vibrant manufacturing sector in the region, with more jobs for GCC nationals. In the next decade, demand for local defence products and services could grow to approximately $30 billion annually from a current level that we estimate to be around $6 billion.
From traditional to impact philanthropy
GCC family philanthropies could maximize the impact of their charitable giving and create a legacy of philanthropy around their family by adopting a more modern approach like leading global family-owned philanthropic institutions. To do so, they will need to institutionalize their philanthropic involvement, introduce innovative financing tools, and implement impact measurement.
Safeguarding GCC consumers
GCC governments need to strengthen their consumer protection policies. The task is magnified by the rise of e-commerce and the sharing economy, which must be addressed ...

More reports and studies

The state-led economic model is no longer appropriate to the GCC countries as it is undermined by oil dependence, a lack of workforce diversity and skills, a growing need for public services, and insufficient innovation. One effective response is private-sector participation through a comprehensive strategic program of public–private partnerships and privatization initiatives that covers all major sectors of the economy.
For quality learning to take place at the primary and secondary school levels, countries need to have robust protection frameworks for children.
GCC companies must develop powerful capabilities through internal development, mergers and acquisitions, or partnerships if they want to maintain their growth and improve their positioning. As most large GCC companies are linked to the state, governments need to assist by upgrading corporate governance practices.
The GCC countries are in a fiscal crunch. All GCC governments have announced spending cuts, but conventional strategies, such as across-the-board or narrowly focused cuts, could do irreparable harm to GCC countries’ economic and social development. Instead, they need a more effective approach — one that enables them to cut costs and grow stronger simultaneously. This approach is called Fit for Service.
Political stability and safety are prerequisites for tourism, which is why countries must make plans to recover their reputations after incidents of political unrest. Countries need crisis management and perception management. Once a negative event occurs, countries should incentivize tourism, whether from domestic or international sources. Countries should also develop crisis-immune tourism products.
Developing countries, such as the GCC states, are in an excellent position to compete for more of the meetings industry (meetings, incentives, conferences, and exhibitions). The GCC has growing trade activity, a “crossroads of the world” location, and increasing status as prospecting spots for business travellers generally.
GCC policymakers should address the region’s housing shortage with a strategy that brings together housing and socioeconomic policies in a holistic approach that builds communities instead of just housing. Governments should also engage private-sector developers through public–private partnerships, which can allocate resources more effectively and transfer knowledge from private developers to government agencies.
The achievement of “information superiority” is a critical determinant of mission success. Developing an information superiority capability requires following five imperatives: treating information as a strategic asset; having centralised governance; building an information culture; taking the right cyber security posture; designing and delivering an integrated ICT infrastructure.
Militaries in the Middle East currently have had relatively basic capabilities for medical logistics planning. As operations and deployments become more frequent and cover longer distances, these rudimentary capabilities could prove disruptive to missions and could endanger lives. Military planners therefore need a more comprehensive approach to medical logistics planning.
A critical element missing in the discussion of changes in Arab countries is a generational perspective. This survey and study allows policymakers and business leaders to take advantage of this valuable generational approach to framing social, economic, and employment policy.

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