Public sector

The roles and expectations of governments are evolving as their challenges increase in complexity, ‎cutting across multiple economic sectors and international borders. Now more than ever, government authorities, public institutions, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the Middle East have a need for sound governance and innovative public sector solutions.

At Strategy&, we apply ‎proven methodologies and cutting-edge thought leadership in the public sector to enable our clients to keep ‎pace with changing social priorities and economic realities. Our partners advise public sector clients on how to achieve transformations by developing capabilities-driven strategies, defining and implementing public policy, and establishing strong public sector governance. The topics we consult on include social services, education, public health, finance and tax administration, climate change, national security, information and communications technology, and e-government.

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Our thought leadership

Private-sector participation in the GCC
The state-led economic model is no longer appropriate to the GCC countries as it is undermined by oil dependence, a lack of workforce diversity and skills, a growing need for public services, and insufficient innovation. One effective response is private-sector participation through a comprehensive strategic program of public–private partnerships and privatization initiatives that covers all major sectors of the economy.
Safeguarding children in the GCC
Governments need to establish comprehensive frameworks for child protection at a national level. This requires proper reporting and intervention within seven pillars: a solid governance model; unified standards for the definition and identification of maltreatment; mandated — but safe — reporting; confidentiality in information management; safe recruitment of school staff; the introduction of child protection notions into the curriculum; the designation of Child Protection Liaison Officers at schools. These pillars are embedded within a comprehensive legislative and policy framework.
How GCC companies can become global competitors
GCC companies must develop powerful capabilities through internal development, mergers and acquisitions, or partnerships if they want to maintain their growth and improve their positioning. As most large GCC companies are linked to the state, governments need to assist by upgrading corporate governance practices.
Fit for Service government
The GCC countries are in a fiscal crunch. All GCC governments have announced spending cuts, but conventional strategies, such as across-the-board or narrowly focused cuts, could do irreparable harm to GCC countries’ economic and social development. Instead, they need a more effective approach — one that enables them to cut costs and grow stronger simultaneously. This approach is called Fit for Service.
Surviving disaster
Political stability and safety are prerequisites for tourism, which is why countries must make plans to recover their reputations after incidents of political unrest. Countries need crisis management and perception management. Once a negative event occurs, countries should incentivize tourism, whether from...
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Developing countries, such as the GCC states, are in an excellent position to compete for more of the meetings industry (meetings, incentives, conferences, and exhibitions). The GCC has growing trade activity, a “crossroads of the world” location, and increasing status as prospecting spots for business travellers generally.
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GCC policymakers should address the region’s housing shortage with a strategy that brings together housing and socioeconomic policies in a holistic approach that builds communities instead of just housing. Governments should also engage private-sector developers through public–private partnerships, which can allocate resources more effectively and transfer knowledge from private developers to government agencies.
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The achievement of “information superiority” is a critical determinant of mission success. Developing an information superiority capability requires following five imperatives: treating information as a strategic asset; having centralised governance; building an information culture; taking the right cyber security posture; designing and delivering an integrated ICT infrastructure.
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A critical element missing in the discussion of changes in Arab countries is a generational perspective. This survey and study allows policymakers and business leaders to take advantage of this valuable generational approach to framing social, economic, and employment policy.

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Client examples

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