OrgDNA

Org DNA Profiler® Survey

Organizations with strong execution “DNA” tend to share similar characteristics. By fostering these traits, you can improve your organizational performance. Here are a few key improvement areas customized for you: 

  • Quickly translating key strategic and operational decisions into action
  • Relaying competitive information quickly and effectively to headquarters
  • Making good on commitments to others 
  • Maintaining disciplined efforts where you can win
  • Ensuring consistent messages from top leaders
  • Successfully adapting to market changes
  • Creating clarity around roles and responsibilities
  • Correlating career advancement and compensation with performance
  • Promoting a distinctive culture that creates a competitive advantage
  • Encouraging leaders to "walk the talk"
  • Sending consistent messages to the market
  • Giving employees metrics to evaluate business impact
  • Having the right number of organization layers
  • Giving field employees insight into the bottom-line impact of daily choices
  • Consistently rewarding innovation
  • Pursuing and rewarding collaboration across organizational lines
  • Prioritizing capabilities when evaluating opportunities
  • Maintaining good information flow across the organization
  • Acting decisively
  • Limiting overlapping roles
  • Establishing influence based on reputation, credibility and relationships
  • Motivating people with values and pride

The outgrown organization: “The good old days meet a brave new world”

Too large and complex to be effectively controlled by a small team, this organization has yet to "democratize" decision-making authority.

The outgrown organization is literally bursting at the seams — it's expanded beyond its original organizational model. Too large and complex to be controlled effectively by a small team of senior executives, it has yet to “democratize” decision-making authority. Consequently, much of the organization’s potential remains untapped. Because power is closely held at the top, the outgrown organization tends to react slowly to market developments and often finds it cannot get out of its own way. If you’re in the middle of this organization, you might well see opportunities for positive change, but it’s just too hard to run these ideas up the flagpole. The legacy of top-down direction and decision-making is well entrenched, and old habits die hard.

In an outgrown organization, people are motivated more by values and pride versus incentives and rewards. Workarounds are a common occurrence since process and internal issues typically get in the way of focus on markets and customers. Top leaders typically deliver consistent messages and collaboration across organizations run high. Yet, influence in the Outgrown organization depends mostly on title and role.

This model worked very well when the organization was smaller and less complex, but now it is stunting growth of the organization and the career development of its best and brightest. Ironically, this unhealthy type is a natural outcome of early success, and an easy trap for high-growth companies to fall into. It’s worth paying attention to its symptoms, so you know which temptations to avoid.

The coherence index specifically measures the coherence or consistency of your organization's strategy. Most outgrown organizations score lower in this area. Coherent companies have a clear set of capabilities that are in line with their strategy and that they use over and over again in their portfolio. Please visit the coherence profiler to learn more about the strengths of coherence.


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Want to learn more about the outgrown organization?

Results: Keep what’s good, fix what’s wrong, and unlock great performance
The companies featured in chapter nine have demonstrated some of the hallmarks of resilient behavior, but they, too, deal with ongoing organizational challenges. What distinguishes their progress, however, is the ability to bounce back quickly from adversity. Why? Because all of the organization’s building blocks perform as they should, both individually and collectively. In fact, the hallmark of the resilient organization is the seamless manner in which all four building blocks — decision rights, information, motivators and structure — integrate with one another to drive the organization and its performance forward. This seamless alignment is what enables these organizations to demonstrate ten winning behaviors … which, together, drive results.
How to design a winning company
The eight components of your organizational genome hold the secret to unleashing superior performance.
The secrets to strategy execution: The idea in practice
How can a company execute its strategy more effectively without making costly, disruptive changes to its organizational structure? Originally published in The Harvard Business Review, this “Idea in Practice” piece uses the story of a highly successful global company to illustrate how to uncover serious obstacles preventing your company from meeting its goals.
How to prevent self-inflicted disasters
All too often, companies unintentionally create their own worst crises. With a little awareness of your organizational DNA, you can avoid that fate — and the headlines that go with it.
The passive-aggressive organization
Passive-Aggressive organizations are friendly places to work: People are congenial, conflict is rare, and consensus is easy to reach. But, at the end of the day, even the best proposals fail to gain traction, and a company can go nowhere so imperturbably that it's easy to pretend everything is fine.
The Coherence Premium
ustainable, superior returns accrue to companies that focus on what they do best. The truth is that simple, and yet it’s incredibly hard to internalize. It is the rare company indeed that focuses on “what we do better than anyone” in making every operating decision across every business unit and product line. Rarer still is the company that has aligned its differentiating internal capabilities with the right external market position. We call such companies “coherent.” We’re not suggesting that companies disregard market signals; all strategy is set within that vital context. We are suggesting, however, that companies start from the opposite direction, figuring out what they’re really good at and then developing those capabilities (three to six at most) until they’re best-in-class and interlocking.
Stop blaming your culture
Start using it instead — to reinforce and build the new behaviors that will give you the high-performance company you want.